was successfully added to your cart.

Welcome to our Fly Fishing Community

Category Archives: Wild Fish Conservancy

Wild Fish Conservancy Spring E-News

By | Wild Fish Conservancy | No Comments

Wild Fish Conservancy publishes a quarterly E-Newsletter – Wild Fish Runs Solitude Reels supports the Wild Fish Conservancy.  Learn more about the Wild Fish Conservancy, and we know you will want to support them too!  Click here to subscribe to the Wild Fish Conservancy electronic newsletter.  Wild Fish Runs is a quarterly email newsletter that focuses on Wild Fish Conservancy activities and initiatives, including project updates and upcoming events. A nonprofit conservation organization headquartered in Duvall Washington, Wild Fish Conservancy is dedicated to the recovery and conservation of the region’s wild-fish ecosystems. Through science, education, and advocacy, WFC promotes technically and socially responsible habitat,hatchery and harvest management to better sustain the region’s wild-fish heritage. The organization was founded in 1989 under the name Washington Trout. In February 2007,  they changed their name to Wild Fish Conservancy in order to better communicate our goals and strategies, and to minimize ambiguities regarding our mission and affiliations. Since 1989, Wild Fish Conservancy has built a reputation among public and tribal agencies, the business community, scientific institutions, and environmental and community organizations for effectiveness, technical credibility, and a focus on the resource. Wild Fish Conservancy has a staff of over 20 professional scientists, advocates, and educators, and a Board of Directors made up of dedicated and accomplished scientists, natural-resource managers, business people, and activists. They work closely with a broad and dynamic coalition of regional and national conservation organizations, academic institutions, community organizations, and other scientists. Wild Fish Conservancy is often relied on by other conservation advocates for its technical expertise in wild-fish ecology, and the Wild Fish Conservancy staff has developed mutually respectful, professional relationships with key management and policy personnel at all relevant local, state, tribal, and federal agencies. Mission Wild fish have been an integral part of the economic, cultural, and ecological fabric of the Northwest for thousands of years. Unfortunately, over the last several…

Read More

Fly Fishing Conservation and the CCA

By | Fly Fishing News & Events, Wild Fish Conservancy | No Comments

Fly Fishing Conservation Solitude Fly Reels captain, Jonathan Knapp, had the honor of attending the Coastal Conservation Association North Sound Chapter annual banquet and fundraiser.  There was one proud winner of a Solitude Reel last weekend! Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) is a non-profit organization with 17 coastal state chapters spanning the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic seaboard, and the Pacific Northwest.  CCA began in 1977 after drastic commercial over-fishing along the Texas coast decimated redfish and speckled trout populations. 14 concerned recreational anglers created the Gulf Coast Conservation Association to combat commercial over-fishing. The stewardship started with the “Save the Redfish” campaign, and by 1985, chapters had formed along the Gulf Coast. By the early ‘90s, the mid-Atlantic region and the New England had chapters. Washington and Oregon opened CCA chapters in 2007. CCA has participated productively in virtually every national fisheries debate since 1984. In the federal court system, CCA’s legal defense fund has been used to defend net bans; fight for the implementation of bycatch reduction devices; support pro-fisheries legislation; and battle arbitrary no-fishing zones. The CCA network is engaged in hundreds of local, state, and national projects that initiate scientific studies; fund marine-science scholarships; build artificial reefs; create finfish hatcheries; initiate hydrologic and contaminant studies; monitor freshwater inflows; support local marine law enforcement; and more. Through broad-based recreational angler support; a strong legal and legislative presence; decades of experience; and an unwavering vision for the future of U.S. and global marine resources, CCA battles for the sustainable health of our coastal fisheries and for recreational anglers’ interests. If you are not a member, think about joining!

Read More

The Tongass – America’s Salmon Forest

By | Wild Fish Conservancy | No Comments

The Tongass is America’s salmon forest and one of the few places in the world where wild salmon and trout still thrive. Some 65 percent of  Tongass salmon and trout habitat is not Congressionally protected at the watershed scale, and is currently open to development activities that could harm fish. It’s time for Congress to better protect the richest resource of the Tongass: wild salmon. According to the U.S. Forest Service, the Tongass includes roughly 17,000 miles of clean, undammed creeks, rivers and lakes that provide optimal spawning and rearing conditions for the region’s copious wild Pacific salmon and trout. All five of North America’s Pacifc salmon species are found in the Tongass National Forest:  Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho (O. kisutch), pink (O. gorbuscha), sockeye (O. nerka) and chum (O. keta). In addition to the salmon, the Tongass supports healthy populations of both the resident and anadromous forms of rainbow trout (O. mykiss), cutthroat trout (O. clarkii), and Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma). Southeast Alaska salmon and trout  provide an important source of employment and income for thousands of fishermen and fishing business owners. According to a study commissioned by Trout Unlimited, Southeast Alaska salmon and trout in 2007 provided close to 11% of regional jobs and supported almost a $1 billion industry that includes local commercial, sport, hatchery and subsistence fisheries.  In 2011, Southeast Alaska produced the largest salmon harvest in the state, with fishermen hauling in a total of 73.5 million fish worth in excess of $200 million dollars The wild salmon spawned and reared in the Tongass National Forest represent approximately 70 percent of all wild salmon harvested from our national forests, roughly 24 percent of Alaska’s overall salmon catch, about 30 percent of the salmon caught on the West Coast of the United States and close to 13…

Read More

Fish Conservancy in Our Backyard

By | Wild Fish Conservancy | No Comments

Learn about The Nature Conservancy fish conservancy project in our backyard restoring estuary work in the north Puget Sound and Skagit county. The project was successful because of the partnerships with the farmers, land owners and local communities. Not only were they able to bring back natural habitat for our wild fish, but they also made the dikes stronger and reduced flood risks. Under Construction: Restoring Estuary Habitat in the Puget Sound from HabitatSeven on Vimeo.

Read More